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TRP DH7 Derailleur and Shifter

Press release:

SHIFTING FOCUS

TRP ENTERS NEW DRIVETRAIN CATEGORY WITH TRP DH7 SHIFTING COMPONENTS.

DESIGNED FOR ROUGH AND ROCKY RIDES ON BIG BIKES WITH 200 MM OF TRAVEL. FOR ALL RIDERS WHO LIKE IT STEEP, FAST AND ENJOY BREATHTAKING AIRTIME.

TRP (TEKTRO Racing Products) presents a new shifter and derailleur designed for the gravity-focused rider. The TRP DH7 series drivetrain components are the result of teamwork between TRP R&D Taiwan, TRP USA, and 5 x DH World Cup Overall Champion Aaron Gwin in cooperation with his mechanic John Hall.

“There is a wide range of bikes, riding styles and riders out there today. TRP focused on the gravity segment to launch its new components. After the first two years working successfully with Aaron and John on brakes, we showed them our ideas for a new TRP shifter and derailleur. When we asked them if they want to become part of the development team, they immediately were open to shift their focus to a drivetrain. Since then they have been pushing and challenging us, which is why we like working with Aaron and John.“ – Lance Larrabee, TRP Managing Director. “It is a pretty complicated project to make a derailleur. There are a lot of patents and all kind of things you have to work around, so you’ve got to be really innovative to find your own way to do things and also make it better,” said Aaron Gwin. “The thing I enjoy most working with the TRP crew is their trust in John [Hall] and I, and vice versa.”

From the beginning, it made sense to focus on gravity riding. In addition to World Cup downhill racing, there is a growing global trend in bike parks and riders’ enthusiasm for them. Park riding is becoming a popular summer sport for many new riders.

One key feature that separates the new TRP DH7 derailleur from the category’s existing products is the Hall Lock, named after Aaron Gwin’s mechanic, John Hall. The Hall Lock is a lever integrated into the derailleur mount, which locks the movement of the B-knuckle around the mounting bolt when closed. The Hall Lock can be opened to easily remove the rear wheel. The Hall Lock’s tension can also be adjusted to better match a bike design or rider preference.

The Hall Lock was born from an ongoing competition amongst the best mechanics on the Downhill World Cup circus – to build the quietest bike on the track. John Hall identified the movement of the derailleur around the B-knuckle as a key point for improvement for several reasons, which are punctuated by chain retention and noise. TRP engineers and John Hall worked closely to build this idea into the DH7’s Hall Lock feature.

A second key DH7 derailleur feature is an adjustable ratchet-style clutch. Depending on a bike‘s suspension design, there can be enough chain growth to feel resistance from the clutch. Other bikes require a heavier force to manage the chain. So the key to TRP’s ratchet clutch is adjustability. If a rider wants to free up the system, he or she can back off the clutch tension, or if more tension is wanted it can be added.

“The end result of improvement, whether it is a product, whether it is results, just elevating the game in all areas – that’s what really drives me,” said John Hall. “Take a chance on it, it is pretty cool how the product grows on you and it becomes yours – you’ll be blown away.”

After two years of field development and elite-level competition by Aaron Gwin, TRP extended the testing and development cycle to four teams in 2019: Intense Factory Racing, Scott DH Factory, Commencal-100%, and the YT Mob.

The TRP DH7 shifter and derailleur are available in black, silver and gold color schemes.

Why does TRP only offer shifter and derailleur for 7 speed systems?

This is the first step to enter the category and TRP feels there is already a well established range of cassettes and chains available. Riders will have the chance to build their preferred package around DH7. In parallel, TRP will continue to learn and build on all types of riders’ feedback and our continued experience.

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